Iraq’s Al-Maliki Government? Lifeless!

 Iraq sliding into the abyss – with Iran and the United States “to the rescue.”

August 1, 2007–Geneva (apj.us)–The time is rapidly approaching when President Bush will have to make a determinative decision: should he prop up Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki, or abandon and dispose of him to the growing opposition to his unimpressive role as President of the Middle East’s newest “democracy?”

Not only is al-Maliki almost as unpopular as Mr. Bush, but now al-Maliki’s own party is turning on him – a mordant reflection of the current revolution against George Bush simmering within the Republican Party in the United States.  

The Iraqi president is a Shiite – and today his Shiite allies are turning on him to the point that they are holding both open and secret meetings with their traditional arch-enemies, the Sunni and the Kurds.

Their goal? To root out al-Maliki. 

Members of Maliki’s own political party have now organized a sovereign government in southern Iraq and the Turks are about to invade northern Iraq – something you will see the White House begin to prepare Americans for in the next few weeks, and yet another sign that the admonitions to Mr. Bush that he would militarily and economically destabilize the entire region are coming home to roost. 

Added to this is the news that Iraqi Army Chief of Staff General Zibari resigned yesterday, saying he was tired of al-Maliki’s constant political interference in military affairs.

Iraq, at best, remains an abortive state – the same total failure it has been since Mr. Bush made his cockeyed decision to invade that nation.

Meanwhile, several reports from the most respected world monitoring agencies tell of severe malnutrition among Iraqi children and adults. In addition, the majority of Iraq’s intellectual elite, business leaders, teachers, doctors, nurses and most other professionals have fled the country, leaving its aptitude pool bare. 

It also appears clear that Secretary of State Condileezza Rice and Secretary of Defense Robert Gates believe that Iraq can never settle the struggles between the three ethnic divisions: Sunni, Shiite, and Kurd. The sole way one of the three might prevail is if one or the other was financed by external sources.

The current al-Maliki government is so weak that it has become itself is a fourth faction, linked to some shrinking percentage of Shiites. To call the al-Maliki crowd a government is just plain fraud.  

While the White House continues to lecture the American people about Iran’s nuclear threat and Iran continues to deny this, the truth is that that the White House, for many months, has been holding clandestine meetings with Iran, which have become so meaty that they now focus on controlling Iraq.

The two nations, Iran and the United States, have already scripted task lists, implemented some, and arrived at measurable criterion that are guaranteed to build confidence and positive movement in US-Iran relations.

The shared prize? Iraq. 

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